Monday, April 13, 2009

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER (WHICH IS WHY THE POWERFUL WANT TO KEEP US DUMB)

Kevin Phillips has a strong piece at TPM about some of the hows and whys of where we are . . . and how rough it'll be now that we're here (H/T Jesse). He also suggests, in an inditect manner, the only way we'll ever make it out. Some highlights:
My 2002 book, Wealth and Democracy, in its section on the "Financialization of America" noted that the "finance, insurance and real estate (FIRE) sector overtook manufacturing during the 1990s, moving ahead in the national income and GDP charts by 1995. By the first years of the next decade, it had taken a clear lead in actual profits. Back in 1960, parenthetically, manufacturing profits had been four times as big, and in 1980, twice as big." Hardly anyone was paying attention. By 2006, the FIRE sector, its components mixed together like linguine by the 1999 repeal of the old New Deal restraints against mergers of commercial banks, investment firms and insurance, had ballooned to 20.6% of U.S. GDP versus just 12% for manufacturing. The FIRE Sector, now calling itself the Financial Services Sector, lopsidedly dominated the private economy.

* * *

This represented a staggering transformation of the U.S. economy - doubly staggering now because of the crushing burden of its collapse. You would think that that opinion molders and the national media would have been probing its every aperture and orifice. Not at all.

Thus, it was pleasing to read MIT economics professor Simon Johnson's piece in the April Atlantic fingering financial "elites" who captured the government for the latterday financial debacle. This is broadly true, and judging from my e.mail, even some conservatives accept Johnson's analysis and indictment. After the furor over the AIG bonuses, the public and some politicians may be ready to start identifying and blaming culprits. This would be useful. Having an elite to blame is a often prerequisite of serious reform.

* * *

The backstop to avarice provided by a wealth culture and market mania from the late 1980s through the Clinton years to the George W. Bush administration, prompted another set of indictments that still resonate: William Greider's Secrets of the Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs The Country (1987), Robert Kuttner's Everything For Sale (1997), Thomas Frank's One Market Under God (2000) and John Gray's False Dawn (1998). More recently, Paul Krugman's books have been equalled or exceeded in timeliness by his New York Times columns blasting the perversity of the Obama-Geithner financial bail-out and the malfeasance of the financial sector. James K. Galbraith, in his 2008 book The Predator State, has elaborated the valid point that too many conservatives over last few decades betrayed their free market rhetoric by supporting a relentless use of state power and government financial bail-outs to advance upper-income and corporate causes. On the other hand, some conservative economists of the Austrian school make related indictments of liberal bail-out penchants.

This could be a powerful framework. All of these critiques have merit, and ideally they might converge as earlier indictments of elite and governmental abuse did during the Progressive and New Deal eras. But I have to return to whether the public will ever be given full information on the fatal magnitude of financialization, who was responsible, and how it failed and crashed in 2007-2009. So far, political and media discussion has been so minimal that the early 21st century American electorate has much less readily available information on what took place than did the electorates of those earlier reform eras.

* * *

[T]he principal building blocks that the [FIRE] sector used to enlarge itself from 10-12% of Gross National Product around 1980 to a mind-boggling 20.6% of Gross Domestic Product in 2004 involved essentially the same combination of credit-mongering, massive sector borrowing, highly leveraged speculation, reckless, greedy pioneering of new experimental vehicles and securities (derivatives and securitization) and mega-trillion-dollar abuse of the mortgage and housing markets that became infamous as hallmarks of the 2007-2009 disaster. During Alan Greenspan's 1987-2006 tenure as Federal Reserve Chairman, financial bubble-blowing became a Washington art and total credit market debt in the U.S. quadrupled from $11 trillion to $46 trillion.

To try to put 20-30 pages into a nutshell, the financial sector hyped consumer demand - from teen-ager credit cards to mortgages for the unqualified - to make credit into one of the nation's biggest industries; nearly $15 trillion was borrowed over two decades to leverage de facto gambling at 20:1 and 30:1 ratios; banks, investment firms, mortgage lenders, insurers et al were all merged together to do almost anything they wanted; exotic securities and instruments that even investment chiefs couldn't understand were marketed by the trillions. To achieve fat financial-sector profits, the housing and mortgage markets might as well have been merged with Las Vegas.

The principal inventors, hustlers , borrowers and culprits were the nation's 15-20 largest and best known financial institutions - including the ones that keep making headlines by demanding more bail-out money from Washington and giving huge bonuses. These same institutions got much of the early bail-out money and as of December 2008 they accounted for over half of the bad assets written off. The reason these needed so much money is that they government had let them merge, speculate, expand and experiment on dimensions beyond all logic. That is why the complicit politicians and regulators have to talk about $100 billion here and $1 trillion there even while they pretend that it's all under control and that the run-amok financial sector remains sound.

* * *
But for the moment, let me underscore: the average American knows little of the dimensions of the financial sector aggrandizement and misbehavior involved. Until this is remedied, there probably will not be enough informed, focused indignation to achieve far-reaching reform in the teeth of financial sector money and influence. Equivocation will triumph. This will not displease politicians and regulators leery of offending their contributors and backers.
I don't agree with much of what Phillips believes, and I think he misses some easy fly balls, yet he and I completely agree that "[a]ll of these critiques have merit, and ideally they might converge as earlier indictments of elite and governmental abuse did during the Progressive and New Deal eras."

We need more critique. We need more citizens striving to understand what's happening and demanding ever more analysis from the financial press and from the mainstream press. And from its elected officials.

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10 Comments:

Blogger steves said...

We need more critique. We need more citizens striving to understand what's happening and demanding ever more analysis from the financial press and from the mainstream press. And from its elected officials.

I agree, but the problem is that the critique will have to go against people's lack of interest in economics in general. The Administration (and past Administrations) is also working hard to promote their version of the truth and their agenda.

8:31 AM  
Blogger Mike said...

the critique will have to go against people's lack of interest in economics in general

Yes, it will. We have to get more interested in this. We HAVE to.

8:32 AM  
Blogger Smitty said...

Yes, it will. We have to get more interested in this. We HAVE to.

So let's see, 5 blogs I check on regularly are informed and focused on this issue.

But the media? Nothing serious. The letters and phone calls I have sent both of my Senators and my Congressman? No reply; not even the "thanks for your opinions" reply.

Even NPR's coverage is weak!

So what's next? Maybe Mike's Nieghborhood and Around the Keg can come up with some sort of web site we can spam around...

9:33 AM  
Blogger Weaseldog said...

The media will not change their coverage. Their fortunes are entwined in the same system that is failing us.

The degree of Financial Overshoot that these institutions are in is severe enough to cause them a near extinction event.

Even if their debts were wiped, their growth rates are too high and their size is too large, to be supported by just one planet Earth.

The planet can't produce enough industry or resources to justify such an immense financial system, that grows at a rate that exceeds industrial growth.

And now that we're sacrificing industrial growth to feed finance, we are ensuring that the whole system will soon starve and die, after it's finished us all off.

After all, when we finally have nothing left to sacrifice, what will these giant banking corporations gain their sustenance from?

And this is no accident. These same banks, and same bankers have been doing this scam on nation after nation since the 1970s. Before that we had similar predatory scams run on nations for hundreds of years, with the East India Company being a prime example of predatory banking and predatory capitalism.

Though I believe that the bankers know full well that they are destroying the USA, I don't know that Obama realizes this. I think he's being played for the fool. In many ways, he reminds me of Nancy Pelosi. A politician who seems to think that her primary role is to make nice and please all of her wealthy friends.

The primary owners of these banks are in the Middle East. So in reality, we're not bailing out Bank of America or Citigroup, so much as the Bin Ladens and the House of Saud.

And when they can't milk us anymore, they will have transferred all of the golden assets out of the USA and all of the toxic assets into the USA, before orphaning these divisions and filing for bankruptcy.

Even now they are ramping up their industrial base. The UAE plans to be the new center of industrialization and to quit shipping out their oil and natural gas. They are using their wealth to close their borders.

By the time the public wakes up, there will be no need to close the barn doors after the horses are gone. The barn will be burning to the ground.

10:53 AM  
Blogger Smitty said...

The primary owners of these banks are in the Middle East. So in reality, we're not bailing out Bank of America or Citigroup, so much as the Bin Ladens and the House of Saud.

That's what worries me the most. Who are we really bailing out? Who owns this stuff? Who's making the money? It may be our very targets of The GWOT. We get to invade Afghanistan, but in return, we'll pay your bank a bazillion dollars. Solid?

11:27 AM  
Blogger Weaseldog said...

Obama Supporter may soon have a way to prove their patriotism, by buying Bailout Bonds.

11:49 AM  
Blogger Mike said...

letters and phone calls I have sent both of my Senators and my Congressman?How'd the meeting with Stabinow go?

The media will not change their coverage. Their fortunes are entwined in the same system that is failing us.But we can -- and must -- have some influence on what they peddle. If we don't read it/watch it, advertisers won't pay for it.

10:41 PM  
Blogger Mike said...

Maybe Mike's Neighborhood and Around the Keg can come up with some sort of web site we can spam aroundI've been encouraging Applesaucer to start his own blog. Join me in haranguing him into doing so.

10:46 PM  
Blogger Bob said...

"And now that we're sacrificing industrial growth to feed finance, we are ensuring that the whole system will soon starve and die, after it's finished us all off."Exactly!We have not only bought into the bullshit deregulation of the FIRE sector, but whole-heartedly embraced their economic policies as if they were the gospel. They have benefited (short term) from the deindustrialization of America. Whenever company A ships its work to low wage countries, its stock soars. It’s clear where the FIRE sector has it priorities and it is not us.

I wrote a similar post in December here:
http://aroundthekeg.blogspot.com/2008/12/growing-fraud-that-is-wall-street.html

How many people make a good living off this sector? Despite it being a huge piece of GDP, my bet is that less people make a living there than in industrial America, its just the FIRE sector gets paid exorbitantly high salaries. This is not good for the country as a whole.

Economist who have bought this crap are also the quickest to talk down their nose to everyday citizens. I have challenged the economic theories of friends of mine often. More than once people have looked at me and told me how they were looking out for my pocket book. If I would just followed them, all the money I save at Walmart will put my kids through college, so they can grow up and be in the FIRE sector too.


Economic theories are as numerous as poltical opinions. I just cannot figure out why we have so bought into the economic policies of Wall Street.

9:10 AM  
Blogger DED said...

I've been encouraging Applesaucer to start his own blog. Join me in haranguing him into doing so.Harangue, harangue, harangue. :)

8:47 PM  

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